A To Z Of Celtic

Welcome Along To The New Page On The Site As Promised Work In Progress So Be Patient …Ive Kicked Things Of With The Holy Goalie Artur Boruc ,Keep Coming Back i will  Add More ….HH


A…

 

 Artur Boruc  –  Goalkeeper ….


Artur Boruc (Polish pronunciation: [ˈartur ˈbɔrut͡s]; born 20 February 1980) is a Polish professional footballer who plays as a goalkeeper for Premier League club Bournemouth.

He began his career in the Polish third division with hometown club Pogoń Siedlce. He joined Ekstraklasa teamLegia Warsaw in 1999 and, whilst still a reserve, had a spell on loan at Dolcan Ząbki in 2000. Boruc broke through to the Legia first team in 2002 and by 2003 had become the club’s first choice goalkeeper. In the summer of 2005, he joined Scottish Premier League side Celtic. In his five years in Glasgow, Boruc made 221 appearances for the club,[3] winning the league three times, the Scottish Cup once and the Scottish League Cup twice. He found himself at the centre of sectarian-related controversies for his conduct in Old Firm games against Rangers. Celtic fans nicknamed Boruc ‘The Holy Goalie’ for his devout Catholicism. He moved to Italy in 2010 to join Fiorentina, spending two years at the Serie A club before returning to Britain in 2012 to sign for Premier League sideSouthampton, moving to Bournemouth in 2015 after a season on loan.

Boruc made his international debut against the Republic of Ireland in April 2004 and became a regular in the Polishinternational squad, earning over 50 caps. He represented the nation at the 2006 FIFA World Cup and UEFA Euro 2008.



Honours with Celtic

Scottish Premier League

Scottish Cup

Scottish League Cup

2005-06, 2008-09

221 total appearances for celtic between 2005-2010

 


B….

Brother Walfrid
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Walfrid was born of John Kerins and Elizabeth Flynn in Ballymote, a village in south County Sligo in north west Ireland. His ancestors, the Ó Céirín (later anglicised as “Kerins”), were anciently Gaelic lords of Ciarraige Locha na nÁirne, with a long history in Mayo.

He studied teaching and in 1864 joined The Marist Brothers Teaching Order. He moved to Scotland in the 1870s and taught at St. Marys School and the Sacred Heart School where he was appointed headmaster in 1874. He also helped found St. Joseph’s College, Dumfries.

 

In 1888, he founded The Celtic Football Club as a means of raising funds for the poor and deprived in the east end ofGlasgow. In 1893 Walfrid was sent by his religious order to London’s East End. Here he continued his work, organizing football matches for and showing great kindness to the barefoot children in the districts of Bethnal Green and Bow. The charity established by Walfrid was named The Poor Children’s Dinner Table.

He died on 17 April 1915, leaving a surviving brother, Bernard, in Cloghboley, County Sligo. Walfrid is buried in the Mount St. Michael Cemetery in Dumfries.


 

 


 

C…..

Celtic park

Celtic was formed in November 1887 and the first Celtic Park was opened in the Parkhead area in 1888. The club moved to a different site in 1892, however, when the rental charge was greatly increased.

The new site was developed into an oval shaped stadium, with vast terracing sections. The record attendance of 83,500 was set by an Old Firm derby on 1 January 1938. The terraces were covered and floodlights were installed between 1957 and 1971.

The Taylor Report mandated that all major clubs should have an all-seated stadium by August 1994. Celtic was in a bad financial position in the early 1990s and no major work was carried out until Fergus McCann took control of the club in March 1994. He carried out a plan to demolish the old terraces and develop a new stadium in a phased rebuild, which was completed in August 1998.

Celtic Park has often been used as a venue for Scotland internationals and Cup Finals, particularly when Hampden Park has been unavailable. Before the First World War, Celtic Park hosted various other sporting events, including composite rules shinty-hurling, track and field and the 1897 Track Cycling World Championships. Open-air Mass celebrations and First World War recruitment drives were also held there.
More recently, Celtic Park hosted the opening ceremony of the 2014 Commonwealth Games and has also been used for concerts, including performances by The Who and U2.

 

D…

Dixie Deans

Goal machine John ‘Dixie’ Deans would prove to be one of Jock Stein’s most astute signings. The Celtic manager caused a sensation in Scottish football when he signed the controversial Motherwell forward in October 1971 for £17.5k in the aftermath of the disastrous defeat to Partick Thistle in the League Cup Final. The robust and gutsy forward had earned himself a reputation as a troublemaker for his on-field antics with the Lanarkshire club and at the time of Stein’s surprise swoop Deans was serving a six week ban.

 


However under the guidance of Stein the player cleaned-up his act and although he would remain a ferocious competitor his discipline improved beyond recognition. He made a scoring debut for the Hoops at Partick Thistle as the Bhoys cruised to a 5-1 league victory on November 27th 1971. From that moment on, lovable rogue Deans was an idol to the Parkhead support and he repaid their devotion in the best possible way – by scoring goals.

E

The 1967 European Cup Final was a football match between Italian team Internazionale and Scottish team Celtic. It took place at the Estádio Nacional in Lisbon, Portugal on 25 May 1967 in front of a crowd of 45,000. It was the final of the 1966–67 European Cup, the premier club competition in Europe. The match was Celtic’s first European final and Internazionale’s third; they had won the tournament in two of the previous three years.

Both teams had to go through four qualifying rounds to get the final. Celtic won their first two ties comfortably, with their second two rounds being tighter. Internazionale’s first tie was very close but they won their next two by bigger margins. In the semi-final Internazionale needed a replay to win the tie.

Internazionale scored after seven minutes, when Sandro Mazzola converted a penalty. Celtic equalised through Tommy Gemmell after he scored on 63 minutes. Stevie Chalmers then put Celtic in the lead after 84 minutes. The match finished 2–1 to Celtic. It was said to be a victory for football because Celtic’s attacking football overcame Internazionale’s defensive-style “catenaccio” which was considered to be a less attractive way to play the game. Celtic’s manager Jock Stein and the team received acclaim after the match and were given the nickname the Lisbon Lions; considered to be the greatest side in the club’s history.